Tag: Linux

Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux (nmon)

Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux (nmon)

Tech Tips, Software
Linux has many available tools that simply just work. That’s why I prefer it over other operating systems. I can get things done, usually faster and much simpler from a command line in a terminal, or multiple terminals. Windows has useful and powerful shells, and I use them when I need to work on that OS, but I prefer to work in bash. I make use of simple, but elegant installation applications, most notably Apt and PacMan - depending on which of my two preferred distros I have installed. I can install simple, but powerful tools to pull out information about my system’s operation and performance. nmon: One of my goto tools is nmon. (Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux) - originally used by IBM and released as open source in 2009. I wouldn’t categorize “nmon” as old school, but it
Linux type solutions on Windows

Linux type solutions on Windows

Tech Tips
The “Microsoft” Ubuntu command line “App” Sometimes you find yourself working on a Windows-based machine, have to perform a quick task that might normally be very straightforward on a LINUX machine, and you don’t want to spend too much time fumbling through the GUI pointing and clicking until you stumble across what you’re looking for. My first gut instinct usually is to get to the command line quickly and work from there. I installed the “Microsoft” Ubuntu command line “App” on a Windows 10 test machine recently hoping it would become the perfect solution to such situations, but it has been a disappointing experience so far. Maybe I’ll have a better opinion after I spend more time with it, but I doubt I’ll see this installed on too many machines I run into – at least for a while. Lucki
Ubuntu Studio 16.04.3 LTS

Ubuntu Studio 16.04.3 LTS

Software
Halloween will soon be here, so I figured I’d get with the spirit of the season and do something scary! Yes, that’s right, venture out of my comfort zone and take the long and twisted path through the spooky digital dark woods of lonely Linux distributions. In a world where Mac OS and Windows dominate the DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) world, Linux offers some impressive potential. That said, it’s time I put a little effort into actually doing something with all that potential. My favorite DAW has been Logic Pro X on a MacBook Pro. I’ve even used it on a Mac Air with some success. I’ve never been too impressed with using a standard Windows laptop for a portable DAW, but let’s see what I can do with a somewhat low powered laptop and Linux. To build this “Frankenstein” I chose U
Linux Rolling Releases

Linux Rolling Releases

Software
Linux Rolling Releases I have come to appreciate Linux rolling releases. Particularly Arch based or related distributions. The one issue I have run into on occasion has been stability after an update/upgrade. I haven't experienced any show stoppers lately as my current favorite Manjaro XFCE has been very solid, but why take chances. My initial approach years ago would have been to dual boot Windows 10 with Manjaro. I never really thought I was gaining anything, other than to have the ability to run Windows-only software. If you don’t, then what’s the point. I’m not going to keep Windows around just for a security blanket Yes, I've done the Win/Linux dual boot in the past more for convenience than practicality. Sure I could have gone the Virtual Box route, but that seems to have more
Breaking the Chains

Breaking the Chains

Software
Lately, I have become less enchanted with Windows 10 per each update. It might be a weird mood in the air this summer. Updating an Arch based spin always feels like an improvement rather than a "HotFix" for something that needs "fixing". I know Linux updates are intertwined with numerous fixes, but there's something enlightening and less mysterious about updating from a repository with "Paceman". I sense something about Windows that feels like I have less control over my computer than I do with Linux. Aside from all the privacy and system reporting tweaks when installing Windows you are allowed to do. There are still some veiled baked in settings that you get hardcoded just for you. It's like the system is telling you what is good for you "We know what's best for you...just check yes for ...