Tag: computers

In Case of Winter Storm – Eat Chili

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On cold miserable days, nothing beats a hot bowl of chili. Yes, hot coffee will help warm you up while sitting in front of your computer, but slowly savoring each hot spoonful of chili while you review your work on the screen is a very nice complement. The wind, sleet, and cold may be pounding against the outside of your shelter, be it an office, home, apartment, ship, shop, truck, or possibly trailer, but a great cup or bowl of chili can give some well deserved comfort. Sitting or standing in front of your computer screens can get cold if your not getting up and moving around much...if you can. I love having a hot cup of coffee and some spicy chili take the edge off the cold days and nights.Sometimes when you get so wrapped up working on something, be it a solution to a problem, or build...

Days Grow Shorter

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The great push to get all timely side projects done before the Holidays begins. “The September and October surge” tasks I know I should start before the snow and ice sweep across the land.Summer is over and suddenly, as if by total surprise, approaching seasonal imposed deadlines become priority. “Didn’t I just come off the Spring - Summer surge?” It’s the yearly temperature influenced push that some might misinterpret as productivity preparedness. If you plan on working within some level of comfort from the cold you should start thinking about things you can do before the weather changes. Pace yourself and avoid the last minute frenzy. Most likely there will be a few late nights where the wind will be howling and the cold will have to be kept at bay in order to focus on work. Maybe now i

Minding the Machine

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Most computer systems aren’t much good if they are not provisioned, maintained, or applied effectively to perform a task or set of objectives.For the most part this can all get very complicated or simplified depending on how everything is coordinated from data in to data out. A lot of human intervention still prevails as the norm in such a way that human error often becomes the weak link in the chain. The opportunity for human error must be minimized in many different operational applications. Simplified - it’s not too unreasonable to think a human could impact a system in such a way as to render it unstable or unreliable.It is true that bad applications can be built on poorly structured code, but usually that code was written by an individual or individuals that could impart one’s ineptn

Turing In-Complete (part 2)

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From the ABC (First digital electronic computer) named after it's creators John V Atansoff and Clifford Berry to the fictional Multivac written about by the great science fiction author Isaac Asimov there is a lot of development that would need to take place. We started the first computer revolution with vacuum tubes and switches using the concepts of binary arithmetic and logic, progress to integrated circuits and chips, and push modern silicon limitations beyond today's 5 GHz peak. Here we approach the possible saturation limitation of Moore's law (double number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit every 18 months). If we reach the limitation in modern manufacturing techniques we would theoretically slow the rapid advancements in computer technology and probably never build ...

Turing In-Complete (part 1)

Recent Posts, Data Science, Hardware, Software
Before man-built machines that could be used to manually calculate all the same mathematical problems we now regard as computation, we – humans were regarded as the “computers”, not the artificial machines. This explains the label “manually” calculated. Man built the machines. This has only been true for a relatively short period of time when compared to the timeline man has existed in the current evolutionary state. This technology goes back much farther than the existence of our most popular desktop pc, laptops, tablets, or smartphones. Major developments in the twentieth century progressed at a very rapid pace, not with the help of Extraterrestrial beings, but by some very brilliant humans. Maybe you could make a case for “math” from outer space in ancient history, and you’d be technic