Chromebook Hooked

Too much “Distro-Hopping” looking for the perfect Linux setup can get to be a bore after a while. It sometimes feels like a great time wasting endeavor. I prefer Linux to Windows and OS X because I can usually get a lot of work done without needing a powerful or expensive laptop. I also don’t need all the free built in bloatware or the cost of purchasing all the actual programs I would use. Most Linux distributions have everything I need either rolled up into their base release, or available within their repositories. If your already invested in the Apple ecosystem, staying in that ecosystem usually makes financial sense, and your workflow doesn’t get flipped on it’s head too often. Windows is ingrained in a lot of “work” related use, especially if you work for a company that requires centrally managed devices via their IT department. You may also want a Windows OS available to support software that only works with that operating system. Also remember that there may be licensed applications, security concerns, and more factors that I really don’t need to go into.

I use a Windows OS, OS X, and Linux. I prefer Linux OS, Love the Mac Book Pro hardware, and usually load Linux onto a machine that comes with Microsoft. All these systems have their strengths and weaknesses. I’ve been thinking about simplifying down to only taking one laptop with me when I travel. Whether it’s local travel, or long distance, dragging multiple laptops is not fun. A powerful (expensive) laptop with multiple Operating systems partitioned, Virtual machines, or a low powered dedicated machine seems like a better option. Even these choices have their drawbacks. If I bought a new Mac Book Pro to take on the road, I’d be worried about losing it or having it stolen. I think I’d prefer to leave it at home and take cheap laptop on the road, but then I’m stuck with a less than stellar laptop, that might not have the battery power or speed to get much work done. I have relied on a Linux netbook as my preferred setup, but I’ve recently become interested in Chromebooks.

I can see the need for a powerful laptop computer as the preferred all in one mobile office.

Smartphones have put a big dent into that requirement. I have a nice little keyboard I can use with my iPhone, but sometimes I need a laptop with me as well. There will be times when I will need a Windows, Mac, or Linux machine.   There will be times when all I need to get some work done is my phone. I was thinking I should just stick with the Mac Book Pro, although it’s not the latest hardware. (still a good laptop despite its age) I thought about upgrading to a newer more powerful Mac Book Pro, but why if I can use a Chromebook which is a lot less expensive to serve the same function.

I don’t need a Chromebook with touch screen, or to double as a tablet. I prefer the laptop form. That really lowered the cost, and I was able to pick up a nice little Samsung 3 Chromebook with 4 gigs of ram and 32 Gb hard drive – on sale. It didn’t take long to get up and running. As someone who works with Linux more often than any other operating system, even I was impressed with the startup – almost instant on was even quicker than my Linux laptop. First thought of course was to replace the Chromebook OS with Linux, but after a few days of using the laptop for basic tasks, I decided to stay with the original OS for now. If the option to run Linux apps becomes available for this model, I would be even more reluctant to overwrite the system. I have a nice lite-weight Ideapad running Mint 19 (for now) if I need to bring a Linux laptop with me. The idea is to see how much I can do with the Chromebook alone for a few weeks – or longer.   If all you want a laptop for is basic content creation, then maybe the Chromebook is for you. To blog, it works great. The Samsung has a nice keyboard, feels rugged enough to survive the hazards of the road, and has a good screen. For the price, the Chromebooks make for a nice mobile office alternative. I don’t get the impression that I’m compromising on any level. I do believe that I saved a lot of money purchasing a Chromebook vs upgrading my main mobile laptop choices between a new Windows laptop or Apple device. I could still end up with a different opinion as time goes by. I don’t see myself abandoning Linux or Apple anytime soon.

If you need to work with software programs that require a lot of processing power, a specific operating system, then the Chromebooks might not work for your needs. If you require better than average battery life, budget friendly cost, have Internet access available, and usually work within a browser, than a Chromebook might be a nice alternative.  I find that I’m already rethinking my work habits to accommodate using the Chromebook.

Looking way down the road, I might not be too surprised to find myself purchasing another Chromebook. It’s too soon to actually say, but a lot will be determined by how one adapts to working with this type of system/ecosystem. It will be interesting to see if more people who decide to purchase a new computer rather than a tablet or major OS preinstalled  laptop choose to purchase a Chromebook. For blogging, this is a workable solution for travel. All my work gets backed up, and I don’t worry about losing any work I’ve done if the laptop fails while I’m writing – (everything gets backed up to the cloud).  I can still work offline, but I probably won’t need to very often. The Chromebook was a worthwhile investment that I don’t regret. The more I use it, the more I like it. I’m still learning what I can do with this Chromebook.