Software

Waiting For Darkness | Julia Programming Language

Waiting For Darkness | Julia Programming Language

Blog, Software
The nights will soon be growing longer as the dog days of summer draw to a close and we slowly ease closer to Fall. Cooler nights, rain, and wind will become the norm. We retreat to the inner sanctum with the radio (podcasts) playing in the background. A hot cup of coffee, dim light on above the workbench, trusty low powered laptops displaying simple terminals which facilitate exploring the possibilities of learning some new tips and tricks. No GUIs to distract into a mindless point and click wandering. Cold dark dreary weather is perfect for perusing through some deep technical papers, thick computer books (yes, actual books made of paper and ink), or “help” files often neglected but often associated with our favorite coding language, IDE, or debugging programs. Like Alchemists searc
SolaceCoin: Helping Others One Block At A Time

SolaceCoin: Helping Others One Block At A Time

Software
SolaceCoin: SolaceCoin was created to help charities while also serving as a currency for daily usage. How it works 6% of each block mined will be given the "Dev wallet" 30% of which will go to the charity wallet. the rest will be used to get listed on exchanges and support continuing development. These coins will be slowly released to exchanges and the proceeds will be donated to a charity. Charities are chosen by the community through voting. Driven by CryptoNote: Anonymous transactions, no public ledger; used by other coins such as Monero “SolaceCoin is a Crypto Currency waiting to make the world a better place one block at a time” Specs: Algorithm: Cryptonight Heavy Block Window Time: 60 Seconds Total Supply: 21 Billion Block reward +- 6000 as block reward varies Using Camel di
Meltdown – How much will your CPU be affected?

Meltdown – How much will your CPU be affected?

Software, Tech Tips
Meltdown and Spectre were a hot topic this week for anyone who uses a computer. That would be a huge number of affected systems mainly because Intel chips were highlighted as having a design flaw (apparently for many years) that presents a “potential” Security weakness that could be capitalized on for some malicious activity. ARM and AMD chips also are identified as having the same or similar problems. The issue is how the CPU passes control to the kernel operations, then takes control back. Speculative execution is used to increase performance, but due to the CPU vulnerabilities, sensitive data may be exposed. Meltdown affects the isolation between applications and the operating system. This requires hardening the system against any exploits that could leverage these vulnerabilities. Anyw

Solus

Software
I thought that I might give the latest Solus MATE a try while I was looking at writing a few words about terminal run file managers. I used it a while back with the Budgie desktop and liked it a lot. It was a great OS for my laptop, but I was spending most of my time using Windows 10, Manjaro, and Ubuntu for some work I was doing and I think I just got distracted and forgot about it. No complaints, just sometimes circumstances send you in odd directions that you hadn’t planned on and some things get left behind. Anyhow, I was listening to the Late Night Linux podcast  https://latenightlinux.com/  the other day and remembered that I kind of liked that Solus “OS”. I probably shouldn't refer Solus as a spin or Distro since I believe it’s built as an Independent development. (not directly b
Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux (nmon)

Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux (nmon)

Tech Tips, Software
Linux has many available tools that simply just work. That’s why I prefer it over other operating systems. I can get things done, usually faster and much simpler from a command line in a terminal, or multiple terminals. Windows has useful and powerful shells, and I use them when I need to work on that OS, but I prefer to work in bash. I make use of simple, but elegant installation applications, most notably Apt and PacMan - depending on which of my two preferred distros I have installed. I can install simple, but powerful tools to pull out information about my system’s operation and performance. nmon: One of my goto tools is nmon. (Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux) - originally used by IBM and released as open source in 2009. I wouldn’t categorize “nmon” as old school, but it